Immunology

Immunology

We offer both custom in vivo model and immunoassay development to assess immunopharmacology and immunotoxicology of drug candidates, as well as translational target-specific pharmacodynamic (PD) biomarker assays in rodent and non-rodent species.
 

We offer both custom in vivo model and custom immunoassay development to assess immunopharmacology relevant to your drug candidate and target. Capabilities include development and analysis of target-specific immunophenotyping panels, cytokines/chemokines/inflammatory mediators, ex vivo innate immune function and ex vivo adaptive immune function. We can develop custom models that assess immunopharmacology of both small molecules and biologics. The In Vivo Facility is also experienced with infectious disease, tumor, and autoimmune preclinical models. We collaborate with investigators to develop and implement proof of concept studies in disease models in order to demonstrate efficacy of therapeutics.

 

Understanding potential for immunotoxicity early in the development of a drug can identify off-target effects on the immune system or exaggerated pharmacology, which can drive important decisions regarding a lead compound and increase confidence in the successful development of a therapeutic. We work with investigators to develop non-GLP immunotoxicology studies for both biologics and small molecules using a case-by-case approach.

 

The In Vivo Facility collaborates with investigators to develop custom translational target-specific pharmacodynamic (PD) biomarker assays in rodent and non-rodent species that can be utilized throughout the drug development process. We aid in the development of robust and clear-cut pharmacodynamic biomarker assays targeted early in the drug development process that can be translated across species with the potential to be implemented in clinical trials.

 

We draw upon the collective expertise of a diverse pool of faculty at Michigan State University in the fields of Immunology, Microbiology, Pharmacology, and Toxicology to drive the development of in vivo models that determine mechanisms of immunotoxicity.